A book with a family member in the title

The notion behind this one was that some sort of family member term would appear in the title. My guess was this would result in a lot of unnamed women in the title, because “Profession’s Wife” seemed to be a very popular title pattern back when I made this particular task. I wasn’t wrong. Women are just more likely to be stuck being described in relation to someone else, usually a man, while men get to just be whatever they are.

Nanny Ogg’s Cookbook
by Terry Pratchett
This is not a book that can stand on its own. It’s purely a fun, probably impractical, romp for folks who are already fans of Discworld. Indeed, the more of Discworld you’ve read, the more enjoyable it is. All the recipes are possible to make on the Discworld, but I’m not so sure about our world.

Possible Other Categories
A book with pictures
A book you can read in a day
A book featuring a profession you are unfamiliar with (witch)
A book with a character’s name in the title
A book involving a mythical creature
A book involving a fire
A book set in the city

My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises
by Frederik Backman
Oh, we’ve had this one before. There’s been a development since then, namely that Nordisk Film has bought the rights. Expect a film in a couple years, followed by an inferior but more accessible American remake about a year or two after that.

Possible Other Categories
A book about death or grief
An allegorical book

The Stepford Wives
by Ira Levin
This has been adapted more times than you’d probably think. Supposedly it is meant to be satire, but the original ending is too nasty for that to really hold up. Best adaptation ending is the one where the women break free and murder the men. Actually, a lot of books would be immensely improved by having that ending. Clockwork Orange would be a good one to start with.

Possible Other Categories
A book with an adaptation you enjoyed (or not) first
A book you can read in a day
A book about feminism (the original does kind of tackle feminist issues)
A book mentioned in a movie or tv show
An allegorical book

The Husband’s Secret
by Richard Dowling
There’s a far more modern book by Liane Moriarty, with a very pretty cover. But as no author was listed, I’ve arbitrarily decided on an incredibly obscure detective novel by an obscure Irish novelist. He wasn’t one of the greats. He wasn’t a Joyce or a Yeats. No, he wrote ordinary stories for ordinary people, and made a decent enough living at it. The most I could really find on him was a preview page of an obituary for him by a Jesuit journal.

Possible Other Categories
A book published before you were born

My Father’s Dragon
by Ruth Stiles Gannett
This is a Newbery book that probably actually has aged decently. It’s also actually about a dragon, and is not a metaphor for drug addiction. Although you have to admit, that’s an epic re-interpretation of a simple children’s chapter book.

Possible Other Categories
A book you can read in a day
A book with pictures
A book involving a mythical creature
A childhood classic you’ve never read

Père Goriot
by Honoré de Balzac
As a person of French descent, I know I’m supposed to like Balzac, one of the lauded greats of French literature. But I don’t! He practically invented the realist novel about awful people that is also a thinly veiled fictionalized autobiography of a generally unpleasant man. Goroit was supposed to be his take-down of French high society but… well, that’s not what French high society took away from it.

Possible Other Categories
A book with an adaptation you enjoyed (or not) first
A book set in the city
A book with a character’s name in the title

Daddy’s Little Princess
by Cathy Glass
This author is weird. She specializes in memoirs about her messed up foster kids. Even with fake names for herself and them, it has got to be just… not cool to have your foster mom making bank on your screwed up life. I really hope she at least splits her revenue, because otherwise this is all very exploitative.

Possible Other Categories
A book from a genre you didn’t know exist (There’s actually a name in Japanese for the type of realist tearjerker this fits, but I can’t for the life of me remember it right now)
A book based on a real person
A book about mental health
A book about a difficult topic (child abuse)

In-laws
by Gloria Call Horsley
Here’s one where I chose arbitrarily just to save hassle. The title as listed didn’t seem to exist. Putting it, and the slight variation “in-laws” through WorldCat mostly gave me law books, not in-law books. GoodReads did even worse, rendering only Hebrew law themed fiction. At least Open Library gave me books with the actual string and some relationship to family involved. This is actually a clinical family therapy text for serious in-law problems. Yikes.

Possible Other Categories
A book based on a real person (case studies!)
A book about mental health
A book you can read in a day (well, it might be too dry for that…)

Mother Goose Treasury
by Priscilla Lamont
Technically, Lamont is the illustrator only, as these rhymes are seriously old and as folklore, anonymous in nature. And some of them we could all do without. I’m looking at you, toxic heteronormative gender binary reinforcing poems.

Possible Other Categories
A book with pictures
A book you can read in a day
A childhood classic you’ve never read
A book with an adaptation you enjoyed (or not) first
A book with an animal in the title
A book with a character’s name in the title
A book involving a mythical creature

Are You My Mother
by Alison Bechdel
You know whose fault this lesser work of Bechdel’s is? Therapists who still look to Freud. Freudian theory in period pieces can be fun. Freudian theory being used today for actual therapeutic purposes is terrible. I’m going to attribute the good stuff to the influence of Virginia Woolf, who at least didn’t think she was a scientist.

Possible Other Categories
A book based on a real person
A book with pictures
A book you can read in a day
A book with a queer/lgbt+/quiltbag protagonist
A book about mental health

Mother-Daughter Book Camp
by Heather Vogel Frederick
So, this is the last book in a middle-grade to YA progression series. What I mean is that the reader is expected to age up with the characters. Here the characters (all, as far as I can tell, your basic New England middle class white girl) are about to go to college. I continue to find the entire genre of YA unfathomable and uninteresting. Next!

Possible Other Categories
The next book in a series

Children of the Mind
by Orson Scott Card
No.

Possible Other Categories
The next book in a series

The Good Daughter
by Jasmin Darznik
This is a very popular title. Among the options were a pedestrian murder mystery, many romance novels, and lots of memoirs. I opted for the one about an Iranian mother and daughter. Daughters. Mothers. Whatever. It’s really not the best book on Iran’s recent history and social context, but I wasn’t going to list yet another mediocre book by a white person when I had another option.

Possible Other Categories
A book based on a real person

The Daughter’s Secret
by Eva Holland
Having a “the” in the title greatly narrowed this one down, as “A Daughter’s Secret” seems to be far more popular. We’re back to one we’ve had before, therefore. And I still have little interest in contemporary realist fiction.

Possible Other Categories
A book about a difficult topic

Daughter of the Blood
by Anne Bishop
Fantasy novel requiring many content warnings. Also, it has wildly diverging ratings that don’t seem to track across gender or race or some other quantifiable I can pin down and say “aha! That’s what’s going on!”. I’ve never actually gotten around to reading any Bishop novels, and I can’t say I’m inspired to start by the lengthy content warnings people have attached to her debut novel here.

Possible Other Categories
A book about a difficult topic (the list feels more Terry Goodkind and less Laurell K. Hamilton, I gotta say)
A book involving a mythical creature

Daughter of Smoke & Bone
by Laini Taylor
YA paranormal romance, which seems to have inspired one of the longest reviews I have ever seen on GoodReads, even if I discount the gifs. And it’s positive. Usually the long reviews are for the misguided bitter rants.

Possible Other Categories
A book involving a mythical creature
A book set in the city

Golden Son
by Jeff Erno
Note it is Golden Son and not Golden Sun, which is an old video game series. Also, as no author was listed, I had a choice between YA dystopian fiction, or a gay merman romance. I think we can all predict how I went with this one, even before clicking the link. The hilarious thing is both books are the second in their respective series, which have names that are vaguely reminiscent of each other. I am 100% sure this is coincidence, and the books could not be more different from each other. Meanwhile, I must say I appreciate the beautiful cover art on the romance novel.

Possible Other Categories
A book you can read in a day
A book involving a mythical creature
A book with a queer/lgbt+/quiltbag protagonist
A book set at sea
A book with a two word title
A book with your favorite color in the title

The Sister
by Paola Kaufmann
This title is far more popular in the plural, so much so that I began to doubt whether “sister” was really how the word is spelled. Anyway, this is by an Argentinian scientist who developed an intense interest in Emily Dickinson. Unlike most fictional biographies, or historical fictions, or whatever this is, you really do kind of need to know more than the rough, inaccurate “reclusive poet” cut-out image of said poet.

Possible Other Categories
A book based on a real person
A book with water in the cover art (some editions)
A book about death or grief
A book about mental health
A book with a two word title

Aunt Dimity Digs In
by Nancy Atherton
A cozy mystery series that manages to combine the supernatural and the cookery sub-sub-genres. Key feature here: lemon bar recipe.

Possible Other Categories
A book involving a mythical creature
A book with a character’s name in the title
Th next book in a series
A book with characters who are twins

Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions
by Mario Giordano
More cozy mysteries, this time set in Sicily with a German lead. This is not as much as a stretch as you’d think, since the author is an Italian-born immigrant to Germany. But he’s also not a 60-year-old costume designer so, obviously, only some of it is “writing what [he] knows.”

Possible Other Categories
A book with water in the cover art
A book with an animal in the title
A book with a character’s name in the title

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